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3.0 out of 5 stars Has issues..., April 5, 2014
By 
gjsx51 (Greensboro, NC USA)
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Unfortunately, this is a case where the presentation subsumed and drowned out the content. This e-book was either churned out by a computer or a freakin' imbecile, because I have never seen so many combined words, misspellings, and awkwardly broken sentences. Not much else can be said about it, and I am so tired of wading through the text that my only thought is that I can't believe I actually finished it (or spent money on it, for that matter). I give it a three star review out of guilt, because my opinion is so soured by the poor craftsmanship that I am figuring the novel was better that I recall. I need to read something that an editor has actually spent some time on for a change...

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling, Frightening: A Great Read!, September 24, 2010
By 
C. R. D'Agostino (bucks county, PA)
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This review is from: 2031: The Singularity Pogrom (Paperback)
The best in Dan Ronco's techno-thriller trilogy, 2031: The Singularity Pogrom brings computer genius Ray Brown's struggle against the sinister and deadly Dianne Morgan to a violent and powerful conclusion. This time Morgan aims to merge human and artificial intelligence to create a super society, and her manipulation of Brown's gifted son and inhumanly talented grandson makes stopping Morgan an extremely personal mission for Brown. In an exciting, fast-paced narrative exploding with Ronco's gift of imagination, readers are treated to unforgettable characters, a full-fledged, realistic futuristic setting, and the haunting prospect of humanity threatened by the misuse of artificial intelligence.

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good writing, horrific premises, July 31, 2011
By 
Samantha Atkins
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This review is from: 2031: The Singularity Pogrom (Paperback)
The author is a great writer and has good knowledge of relevant technology. However this book takes the tired old line that only basically evil or unthinking people want the improvement of humanity or the creation of true strong AI or especially the merger of humans and such AI. The premise preached by this book is that humanity as we are is somehow the best we can or should want to be. To want anything more is to court only destruction. To want it and pursue it passionately leads to an evil person or persons ruthlessly attempting to substitute true evil for our blessed human state. It is revoltingly juvenile and anthropomorphic to hold such a view without nuance.

Those of us that really do want these things want a world where people do not die from merely accumulating a few decades and don't lose their health, looks and mind in the process. We want a world where we and our creations is much smarter and less prone to error and countless near insanities as evolution... Read more

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